Pop Quiz: Jet Ski Injury

From The Trauma Professional’s Blog

This post is for my readers located near large bodies of water!

Personal watercraft use exploded a decade ago, and they are still heavily used for recreation and vacation fun. However, speed and people don’t always mix well. Here’s an interesting case to ponder.

Jet_Ski

photo by Flickr user db2r

An 18-year-old woman was the rear passenger on a jet ski traveling at a high rate of speed (of course). She fell off and was plucked out of the water by the driver. After riding for another 30 minutes, they headed to shore. A short while later, she began experiencing vague lower abdominal discomfort. This slowly progressed throughout the afternoon, becoming more severe.

She presents to your ED, looking uncomfortable and slightly ill. Here are some questions to ponder:

  • What injuries are you concerned about?
  • What diagnostics are appropriate?
  • If surgery is required, what are the appropriate approaches and procedures?

Answer:

According to the First Law of Trauma, the pain is related to the mishap until proven otherwise. You must approach it like any moderate speed motor vehicle crash. In many ways, this mechanism is similar to a motorcycle or bicycle crash, without the road rash. However, high speed and water can also combine to cause a unique injury, the so called water ski / jet ski douche and enema. This occurs when the rider enters the water with a significant feet first component, causing a jet of water to be forced into the vagina or rectum.

As always though, start with a thorough history and physical exam. In this case, the patient has diffuse lower abdominal tenderness, but no other findings on exam. Because of the possibility of water jet injury, a thorough exam of both vagina and rectum is indicated. This requires a speculum and anoscope. Any anomalies that are noted are an indication to proceed to the OR for a thorough exam under anesthesia.

Blunt abdominal injury is also a concern, so FAST may be performed. However, the abdominal pain is an indication for abdominal/pelvic CT using our blunt trauma imaging protocol. A solid organ injury can be managed in the usual manner. But if any anomalies other than the trace pelvic fluid occasionally seen in young women is present, the patient must go to OR.

If the patient does need an operation, start with vaginal and rectal exams again, under anesthesia. Most vaginal lacerations are small and easily closed. However, there have been reports of extensive laceration with heavy bleeding. Simple rectal tears may be repaired, but more complicated ones may also require fecal diversion. If the injury appears complex, a laparotomy will be necessary, and diversion with a colostomy will usually be required.

Bottom line: This injury is an example of what I call a two-factor mechanism: blunt trauma plus high-pressure injection in this case. The trauma professional needs to recognize both and resist the temptation to focus on the more obvious one. Think through the evaluation and management algorithms for each one, combining them where appropriate.

OnSurg thanks collaborative partner Dr. Michael McGonigal. Dr. McGonigal tweets at @RegionsTrauma.

Featured Image (CC): fairuz othman

By

Related Posts

  • Post Image

Comments are closed.